Personal tools
You are here: Home Project news and content updates Pleiades Project Blog Last Week in Pleiades (18-25 March 2024)

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Last Week in Pleiades (18-25 March 2024)

Creators: Tom Elliott Copyright © The Contributors. Sharing and remixing permitted under terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (cc-by).
Last modified Mar 25, 2024 04:08 PM
tags:
Last week the Pleiades editorial college published 26 new and 100 updated place resources, reflecting the work of Jeffrey Becker, Tom Elliott, Greta Hawes, Brady Kiesling, Chris de Lisle, Gabriel McKee, Rosemary Selth, and R. Scott Smith.
Last Week in Pleiades (18-25 March 2024)

A terrain map with orange markers indicating updates and pink circles indicating new place resources. It stretches from central Europe in the northwest to northern India in the southeast.

New Place Resources

  • The Aiakeion was a sanctuary of Aiakos built in Athens in the early fifth century BC, which is identified with the Rectangular Peribolos in the southwestern corner of the Agora. In 374/3 BC it was converted to a granary. It was damaged in the Sullan Sack in 86 BC and in the Imperial period it was a pottery workshop.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • An altar dedicated to Zeus Agoraios, originally erected on the Pnyx in the late fourth century BC, but relocated to the Athenian Agora in the Augustan period.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • A speaker's platform erected on the eastern side of the Athenian Agora by or for Roman generals in the late second or early first centuries BC.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Tom Elliott
  • A speaker's platform erected in the Theater of Dionysus at Athens in the second century CE.
    Creators: Jeffrey Becker
    Contributors:
  • A set of poros benches built on the east slope of the Kolonos Agoraios at the edge of the Athenian Agora in the fifth century BC, which seated 400-500 people and perhaps served as a meeting place for a council or court. They were truncated and rendered inaccessible by further construction in the fourth century BC.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Tom Elliott
  • Cave 13 at Udayagiri, known as the Nārāyaṇa cave, contains a large relief panel of Vishnu's Nārāyaṇa avatar.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • The largest cave temple at Udayagiri, known as the Amrita or Viṣṇupada cave.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • The southernmost cave at Udayagiri, dedicated to an unidentified god.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • Cave 5 at Udayagiri is dedicated to Vishnu and contains a monumental relief panel of Vishnu's Varaha avatar.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • A set of buildings and a stoa built in the Athenian Agora in the 2nd century AD, to provide space for official business in addition to the Metroon and Tholos.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • A square sacred enclosure in the northwest corner of the Agora, in front of the Stoa Basileios at the meeting point of the west road and the Panathenaic Way. It was built ca. 430 BC around a sacred rock. It was gradually obscured by the rising ground levels and built over in the 3rd century AD.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Brady Kiesling; Jeffrey Becker
  • An unfinished Doric stoa with colonnades on both long sides, built at Thorikos in the late fifth century BC, of uncertain function, perhaps a gateway to a sanctuary of Demeter. Material from the structure was spoliated in the Augustan period to build the southwest temple in the Athenian Agora.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • A house located southwest of the Agora in Athens, which was built ca. 475-450 BC and demolished ca. 275 BC. It was used by marble workers, including the sculptors Mikion and Menon. The courtyard contained two cisterns, known as the Demeter Cistern and Menon's Cistern.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • A house at the southwestern corner of the Athenian Agora, built ca. 500 BC, destroyed during the Persian Sack in 480 BC, rebuilt in the 470s and demolished in the late fourth century BC. Finds suggest that in the third quarter of the fifth century BC it belonged to a shoemaker named Simon, perhaps to be identified with the interlocutor of Sokrates known from literary sources.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker; Tom Elliott
  • A rectangular structure in the Athenian Agora, consisting of 11 rooms surrounding a central courtyard, built in the early 5th century AD in connection with the Palace of the Giants. It appears to have been an administrative building.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • The Middle Stoa, the largest structure in the Agora of Athens, was built after 183 BC, as the north side of the South Square. In the Augustan Period, the Odeon of Agrippa was built on its north side. It was destroyed during the Herulian Sack of 267 AD and used as building material for the Post-Herulian Wall.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Brady Kiesling; Jeffrey Becker
  • The New Bouleuterion was the meeting place of the Boule or Council of Athens, built at the end of the fifth century BC on the west side of the Agora, where it formed part of a complex with the Old Bouleuterion and the Tholos. It was modified in the early third century BC and destroyed in the Herulian Sack of AD 267.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Brady Kiesling; Jeffrey Becker
  • The Old Bouleuterion on the west side of the Agora in Athens was built in the early fifth century BC as the meeting place of the Boule or Council of 500. It also housed the Metroon, a shrine to the Mother of the Gods. The Council moved to the New Bouleuterion at the end of the fifth century BC, but the Old Bouleuterion remained in use as an archive and shrine. It was renovated ca. 140 BC and destroyed in the Herulian Sack of 267 AD. In the early 5th century AD, one of the rooms was rebuilt, possibly for use as a synagogue.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Brady Kiesling; Jeffrey Becker
  • The Porticus Absidata was an exedra porticata that served as the northern apsidal entryway to the Forum of Nerva, also known as the Forum Transitorium.
    Creators: Jeffrey Becker
    Contributors:
  • Large settlement and necropolis site in Haranya, India, associated with the Harappan culture (6000-1900 BCE).
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • A two-aisled Doric stoa ran along the south side of the Panathenaic Way from the Stoa Basileios towards the Dipylon Gate, which contained shops. It was constructed over a long period beginning in the early second century BC and repeatedly modified. The building was destroyed in the Herulian Sack of 267 AD, rebuilt, damaged in the Gothic Sack of 396 AD, rebuilt again, and was finally destroyed in the Slavic Sack of 582 AD.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • Bronze Age kingdom or federation of Western Anatolia whose exact location(s) and extent are matters of scholarly debate. Major settlements associated with the kingdom include Kaymakçı Tepe, Panaztepe, Larisa, and Bayrakli.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • A fountain house at the southwest corner of the Athenian Agora, built ca. 350-325 BC, modified in the late 4th and 2nd centuries BC, and destroyed in the Sullan Sack of 86 BC.
    Creators: Chris de Lisle
    Contributors: Jeffrey Becker
  • Eumenes II, king of Pergamon, built this eponymous stoa on the South slope of the Athenian Acropolis ca. 160 BCE. Its position lies between the Theater of Dionysus and the later Odeon of Herodes Atticus.
    Creators: Jeffrey Becker
    Contributors: Brady Kiesling
  • Complex of 20 cave temples in Madhya Pradesh dedicated to the gods Vishnu and Shiva, constructed from the 3rd-5th centuries CE.
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:
  • Temple constructed near the Udayagiri cave complex during the Gupta period (ca. 4th-5th century CE).
    Creators: Gabriel Mckee
    Contributors:

Modified Place Resources